Words and rumors of words: comparative war rhetorics

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Words and rumors of words: comparative war rhetorics

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/10124

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dc.contributor.advisor Davis, Charles N. en_US
dc.contributor.author Payne, Sarah Katherine, 1985- en_US
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.coverage.spatial Greece
dc.coverage.temporal 2001-2009 en_US
dc.coverage.temporal 431-404 B.C en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-03-04T15:11:49Z
dc.date.available 2011-03-04T15:11:49Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2009 Fall en_US
dc.identifier.other PayneS-121109-T1368 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/10124
dc.description Title from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on February 22, 2011). en_US
dc.description The entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Thesis advisor: Dr. Charles N. Davis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description M. A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism. en_US
dc.description.abstract This thesis surveys how democratic governments convince their people to go to war and to continue fighting unpopular wars by exploring the relationship between contemporary and classical war rhetoric. Focusing on the military campaigns of the War on Terror and the Peloponnesian War, the researcher reviews ways in which those in positions of power wield words to build and maintain great empires. The researcher endeavors to support her hypothesis that there exists a raport between contemporary American war rhetorics and classical Athenian war rhetorics by employing phenomenological and hermeneutical methodologies in the study of prima facie appeals and symbolic appeals, respectively, common to George W. Bush and Pericles. Together, a textual analysis and Burkean dramatist critique answer the researcher's question: To what extent is Bush-ean and Periclean wartime oratory similar? Because there exist both straightforward and emblematic correlations within the rhetorics, the researcher concludes there to be a notable association. en_US
dc.format.extent v, 116 pages en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2009 Freely available theses (MU) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh War on Terrorism, 2001-2009 en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Terrorism -- Prevention -- International cooperation en_US
dc.subject.lcsh United States -- Military policy en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Rhetoric -- Political aspects en_US
dc.subject.lcsh English language -- Rhetoric en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Greece -- History en_US
dc.subject.lcsh United States -- Politics and government -- Terminology en_US
dc.title Words and rumors of words: comparative war rhetorics en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Journalism en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name M.A. en_US
thesis.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 703880851 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2009 Theses


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