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dc.contributor.authorVallentyne, Petereng
dc.date.issued2005eng
dc.descriptionhttp://klinechair.missouri.edu/on-line%20papers/equality%20and%20animals-copenhagen.doceng
dc.description.abstractCan material egalitarianism (requiring, for example, the significant promotion of fortune) include animals in domain of the equality requirement? The problem can be illustrated as follows: If equality of wellbeing is what matters, and normal mice are included in this egalitarian requirement, then normal mice have a much stronger claim to resources than almost any human. This is because their wellbeing is much lower than that of normal humans. Thus, equality of wellbeing requires a massive shift of resources away from most humans to most mice. This view, however, seems crazy. I explore this problem and propose a solution.eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Ethics, 9 (2005): 403-433.eng
dc.identifier.issn1382-4554eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/10183eng
dc.publisherSpringer Verlageng
dc.relation.ispartofPhilosophy publicationseng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. College of Arts and Sciences. Department of Philosophyeng
dc.subjectanimal rightseng
dc.subjectequalityeng
dc.subjectsocial and political philosophyeng
dc.subjectegalitarianismeng
dc.subject.lcshAnimal rights -- Moral and ethical aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshWell-being -- Philosophyeng
dc.subject.lcshAnimals (Philosophy)eng
dc.subject.lcshEquality -- Philosophyeng
dc.titleOf Mice and Men: Equality and Animalseng
dc.typeArticleeng


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