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dc.contributor.advisorCameron, Glen T.eng
dc.contributor.authorPe-Aguirre, Jeffrey Joe, 1973-eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on December 7, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Glen T. Cameron.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism.eng
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the influence of media freedom on foreign policy, specifically, the decision of leaders to use militarized force in resolving international disputes. It begins by revisiting the libertarian ideals of the Founding Fathers and creating a game-theoretic model of the libertarian arguments for a free press. The central argument of this study is that an open media industry - one where journalists are free to report the news and express a diverse range of opinions without fear of political and legal reprisal from government - engenders an environment wherein international disputes are settled through bargaining and negotiation, instead of military might. An examination of conflict involvement and level of media freedom of about 180 countries from 1980 to 2001 shows that pairs of countries with free media environments are least likely to be involved in militarized interstate disputes. A total of 50,278 dyad-years were analyzed using logistic regression models. This dissertation proposes that a free press plays a crucial role in overcoming information asymmetries and activating the structural constraints preventing leaders from engaging in costly militarized disputes.eng
dc.format.extentxiv, 124 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc706825340eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/10247
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/10247eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2010 Freely available dissertations (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2010 Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshMass media -- Political aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshMass media policyeng
dc.subject.lcshPress and politicseng
dc.subject.lcshFreedom of expressioneng
dc.subject.lcshGovernment and the presseng
dc.titleGames of information: informational and normative influences of media structures on the likelihood of militarized interstate disputeseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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