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dc.contributor.advisorIspa, Jeaneng
dc.contributor.authorBall, Katharine Ann, 1975-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on December 7, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Jean Ispa.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Human development and family studies.eng
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the knowledge, behaviors, motivation, and barriers that rural low-income women experience in feeding their young children. Qualitative descriptive research was used to investigate the knowledge, motivations, and practices of these mothers. The sample included 18 mothers whose children were under the age of 54 months. All mothers were English speaking, over the age of 18, living at or below 185% of the federal poverty line, participating in federal food programs (Women, Infants and Children (WIC) or Food Stamps), and living in Missouri counties considered more than 50% rural. Four main categories emerged from interviews with the mothers: (1) what mothers want for their children and why; (2) challenges; (3) feeding strategies; and (4) sources of strength. A major finding was that the mothers very much wanted to do what is best for their children; they wanted to provide nutritious foods and role-model healthful eating habits in order to help their children avoid diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Additionally, the results suggested that mothers who relied on family, friends, and government programs (e.g. WIC, Food Stamps, TANF) provided more healthful foods for their young children than those who did not. (Some of the latter group narrowly missed the qualification cut-off for the federal programs.) Like previous research, the current study indicates that, for this sample of mothers, poverty and rural living intersect to create major challenges (e.g., limited financial reserves, long distances to grocery stores) that make it difficult for them to provide the nutritious meals they desire for their children.eng
dc.format.extentv, 121 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc705011223eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/10249
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/10249eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshLow-income motherseng
dc.subject.lcshChildren -- Nutritioneng
dc.subject.lcshParentingeng
dc.titleRural low-income mothers' perspectives on children's feeding practiceseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman development and family studies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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