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dc.contributor.advisorCooper, M. Lynneeng
dc.contributor.authorLevitt, Ashley David, 1980-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on December 7, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. M. Lynne Cooper.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description.abstractAlcohol use in romantic relationships can have positive and negative effects. Previous research suggests that these effects are bidirectional, and dependent on whether partners drink together vs. apart, and the drinker's gender. However, little is known about how these processes differ across people. One individual difference relevant to how people behave in relationships and how they regulate their emotional experience is adult romantic attachment. The current study therefore used an existing database in which both members of 69 couples completed measures of attachment orientation, and provided daily reports of alcohol use, and relationship functioning for a period of 3 weeks to examine the complex interplay among individual differences in attachment and patterns of daily alcohol use and relationship functioning. Results showed a complex picture of effects that were often dependent on multiple factors. Although insecure attachment styles were generally found to have adverse effects on relationship functioning, alcohol use, and the reciprocal associations between them, as expected, the magnitude and direction of effects depended on factors such as the similarity of attachment styles between partners, whether partners drank together vs. apart, and the gender of the drinker. Implications for attachment theory and future research are discussed.eng
dc.format.extentx, 109 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc706697227eng
dc.identifier.otherLevittA-090310-D340eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/10258eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2010 Freely available dissertations (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2010 Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshAttention-deficit disorder in adultseng
dc.subject.lcshAlcoholism -- Psychological aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshDrinking of alcoholic beverageseng
dc.subject.lcshMan-woman relationshipseng
dc.subject.lcshRelationship addiction -- Sex differenceseng
dc.subject.lcshCompulsive behavior -- Sex differenceseng
dc.titleAdult attachment dynamics as a predictor of daily alcohol use and romantic relationship functioningeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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