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dc.contributor.advisorCampbell, Rex R.eng
dc.contributor.authorWallace-Greene, Javonna, 1967-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 7, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Rex Campbell.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstractObesity as a growing epidemic in the United States occurs in higher rates within Black-American populations. Although 100 million Americans in the United States are considered overweight or obese, Black-American women have the highest prevalence rate of obesity than any other subgroup. Most studies focus on unhealthy eating practices, lack of exercise, sedentary lifestyles, differential access to nutritious food and lack of adequate health care as contributors of obesity in Black-American women. But these studies are narrow in approach, lacking cultural constructions and food habits pertinent to the history and biography of Black-Americans. This dissertation explores Black women's perceptions of black culture, food habits, body image and obesity in Columbia, Missouri. This dissertation is theoretically rooted in the tradition of symbolic interaction, which is best suited to explore the culturally derived ritualistic behaviors and traditions within Black Culture. By investigating food habits and cooking practices as symbolic manifestations, direct associations to the development of self, identity and in-group ethnic affiliation emerges. This research uses narratives from 15 in-depth interviews, compiled over a two year period. Results indicate black women's perceptions of self, identity, food habits, and body image was socio-cultural constructions. When holistically viewed, insights provided rich interpretations of one's life experiences and interactions within the groups' cultural milieu.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extent247 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc706824099eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/10263
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/10263eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshFood habits -- Social aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshAfrican Americans -- Foodeng
dc.subject.lcshAfrican American womeneng
dc.subject.lcshObesity in womeneng
dc.subject.lcshExercise for womeneng
dc.subject.lcshBody image in womeneng
dc.titleThe socio-cultural perceptions of food habits, body image and obesity of black-American women in Columbia, Missourieng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineRural sociology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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