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dc.contributor.authorBarstow, Craigeng
dc.contributor.authorGauer, Roberteng
dc.contributor.authorJamieson, Barbaraeng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.description.abstractContinuous electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) reduces the risk of neonatal seizure by 50% compared with intermittent auscultation (IA) (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, systematic review of randomized controlled trials [RCTs]). EFM increases the incidence of cesarean section by 66% and the incidence of operative vaginal delivery by 16% (SOR: A, systematic review of RCTs). It has no effect on the rates of cerebral palsy or neonatal mortality (SOR: A, systematic review of RCTs). An estimate from a Cochrane meta-analysis suggests that a cohort of 628 women receiving EFM could expect to experience 1 less neonatal seizure and 11 more cesarean sections compared with IA controls.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/10318eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2010 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 59, no. 11 (November 2010): 653a-653b.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subject.lcshFetal monitoringeng
dc.subject.lcshSpasms, Infantileeng
dc.subject.lcshFetal anoxiaeng
dc.titleHow does electronic fetal heart rate monitoring affect labor and delivery outcomes?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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