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dc.contributor.advisorWaigandt, Alexeng
dc.contributor.authorVassmer, Sara Beth, 1981-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 8, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Alex Waigandt.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Educational and counseling psychology.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] This study investigated relationships between reported academic stress, caffeine consumption, and illicit prescription stimulant use, as a means of better identifying students likely to use illicit prescription stimulants. Linear regression was used to identify the relationship between reported caffeine use in milligrams, reported frequency of caffeine use, and academic stress. Wald stepwise logistic regression was used to identify demographic and behavioral variables that predict illicit prescription stimulant use. The results suggest there is a significant relationship between academic stress and caffeine use: the number of caffeinated beverages reported consumed, and the amount of milligrams of caffeine reported consumed per week were correlated with the illicit use of prescription stimulants. There was no significant relationship between academic stress scores and the illicit use of prescription stimulants. Frequency of caffeine products consumed, gender, and cumulative grade point average all demonstrated small predictive qualities towards reported illicit prescription stimulant use in the sample.eng
dc.format.extent99 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb81832837eng
dc.identifier.oclc708652732eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/10342
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/10342eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri-Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshCaffeine -- Physiological effecteng
dc.subject.lcshStimulantseng
dc.subject.lcshStudents -- Academic workloadeng
dc.subject.lcshStress in youtheng
dc.titleThe use of cognitive enhancing substances and academic stresseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational, school and counseling psychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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