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dc.contributor.advisorMartin, Barbara N. (Barbara Nell), 1952-eng
dc.contributor.authorTempleton, Chris V., 1959-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on December 7, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Barbara N. Martin.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionEd. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Educational leadership and policy analysis.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The purpose of this study was to focus on how a school district built leadership capacity through the implementation of Professional Learning Communities (PLC). With the intense demands for increased student achievement and the resultant accountability required for that achievement by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation, as well as the frequent turnover of building principals and district leaders, building the capacity of all educators to be leaders is a necessity. Utilizing the process of PLCs to build this leadership capacity is a research-based method for effectively growing the leadership capacity within schools and districts. This case study was conducted in a small Midwestern school district comprised of five buildings: a primary, elementary, intermediate, middle, and high school. Interviews were conducted with the superintendent, the five building principals, and focus groups comprised of members of each building leadership team. Data collection methods included audio recording interviews and an examination of students' academic achievement over the past five years, from 2006 through 2010. The study findings revealed five themes: 1) collaboration grew versus working in isolation, 2) a sense of collective responsibility for the success of all students was developed, 3) an inquiry-based use of data to inform decisions and instruction emerged, 4) shared leadership resulted, and 5) the principal is a key factor in the implementation of PLCs.eng
dc.format.extentix, 140 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb81832941eng
dc.identifier.oclc708662220eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/10346
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/10346eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshUnited Stateseng
dc.subject.lcshProfessional learning communitieseng
dc.subject.lcshEducational leadershipeng
dc.subject.lcshLearningeng
dc.subject.lcshEducational changeeng
dc.titleAn examination of a district-wide implementation of professional learning communities through the lenses of leadership capacity and student learningeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysis (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.nameEd. D.eng


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