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dc.contributor.advisorWoelfel, Stacey W.eng
dc.contributor.authorBoggs, Lee, 1970-eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.coverage.temporal1984eng
dc.coverage.temporal2008eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 25, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Stacey Woelfel.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism.eng
dc.description.abstractAlthough females have campaigned for offices in the executive branch of the U.S. government, none have been elected. According to some scholars and researchers, one of the reasons females have been unable to break through is due to the type of coverage they received from news organizations. Studies have shown gender stereotypes influence how political campaigns and policies involving candidates of the opposite gender are framed. The goal of this study was to determine if the coverage given to female vice-presidential candidates in the 1984 and 2008 presidential campaigns reflected gender stereotypes. This study conducted a quantitative content analysis of two sources from two elections for four candidates (two females and two males), evaluating the total coverage, policy coverage, character coverage, and tone of quotes coverage for males and females. The research found that females received more coverage on feminine policy, characteristics, and total coverage, while one dominated the masculine category and the other was equal to the male in negative quotes. The compiled findings indicate that gender stereotypes were applied within the sources' news coverage of female candidates.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 71 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb82190987eng
dc.identifier.oclc710362891eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/10536
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/10536
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2010 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Congress -- Houseeng
dc.subject.lcshWomen -- Political activityeng
dc.subject.lcshPress and politicseng
dc.subject.lcshPolitical campaignseng
dc.subject.lcshCommunication in politicseng
dc.subject.lcshJournalism -- Political aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshVice-Presidential candidateseng
dc.subject.lcshLegislatorseng
dc.subject.lcshPresidents -- Electioneng
dc.subject.lcshPresidents -- Electioneng
dc.titleA study of gender stereotypes in the news coverage of the 1984 and 2008 vice-presidential campaignseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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