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dc.contributor.advisorSmeda, R. J. (Reid John), 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBinkholder, Kenton M., 1985-en_US
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Fallen_US
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 25, 2011).en_US
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Reid J. Smeda.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Plant, insect and microbial sciences.en_US
dc.description.abstractAnnual bluegrass is the most problematic weed on golf courses in the Transition Zone and Southern United States. Applications of glyphosate are common on dormant zoysiagrass to remove winter annual weeds. In 2007, a suspect population of annual bluegrass (hereafter referred to as CCMO1) in Columbia, Missouri survived an application of glyphosate following more than 10 years of continuous applications. Research was conducted in vitro to identify the extent of glyphosate-resistance in CCMO1. At the field level, alternative herbicides were evaluated for effectiveness on CCMO1. Finally, greenhouse studies were conducted to determine the impact of glyphosate on annual bluegrass seed production at different growth stages. Results indicate that the CCMO1 biotype of annual bluegrass is glyphosate resistant, with an I50 of 0.49 kg/ae ha-1 for CCMO1 compared to 0.09 kg/ha-1 for S. This resulted in a resistance index (R:S I50 ratio) of 5.2 for CCMO1. Field results demonstrated that pre-emergence (PRE) herbicides significantly improved CCMO1 control versus post-emergence (POST) herbicides. The addition of a POST herbicide following a PRE resulted in the most consistent control of annual bluegrass. Seed production in the absence of glyphosate was 15,000 to 16,000 and 21,000 to 30,000 seeds per plant for S and CCMO1 plants, respectively. The addition of glyphosate reduced the number of seeds by 98% and 85% for S and CCMO1 plants, respectively. However, use of glyphosate at recommended rates resulted in viable production of seeds from CCMO1 plants, suggesting that continued applications of glyphosate on glyphosate-resistant annual bluegrass will increase viable seeds in the soil seed-bank.en_US
dc.format.extentix, 100 pagesen_US
dc.identifier.merlinb82190975
dc.identifier.oclc710218684en_US
dc.identifier.otherBinkholderK-121010-T679en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/10546
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2010 Freely available theses (MU)
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theses
dc.subject.lcshAnnual bluegrass -- Weed controlen_US
dc.subject.lcshHerbicide resistanceen_US
dc.subject.lcshGolf courses -- Maintenanceen_US
dc.titleIdentification and management of glyphosate-resistant annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant, insect and microbial sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant, insect and microbial scienceseng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US


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