[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorAllen, William, 1952-eng
dc.contributor.authorHiles, Sara Shipley, 1978-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 29, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Bill Allen.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism.eng
dc.description.abstractClimate change may well be the most important environmental issue of our time. For journalists covering the environmental beat, there is no bigger story - and none more treacherous. Journalists have been accused of distorting the scientific consensus by applying "false balance" to those who say anthropogenic climate change is happening and those who say it isn't. This study interviewed 11 experienced environmental reporters for mainstream print or online publications about how they understand the occupational norm of objectivity as applied to coverage of climate change, and how has that changed since 2000. Results were that subjects expressed support for several of nine dimensions of objectivity considered, but they redefined these terms to fit with their experiences. In the case of "balance", reporters have redefined it to mean applying a "weight of evidence" approach (Dunwoody, 2005) to science stories, and they tend to use global warming "skeptics" as sources very sparingly. There only limited support for increased transparency in journalism, especially if that included revealing the reporter's personal opinions. Eight of 11 reporters interviewed said journalists should still be objective when covering climate change - but they indicated this meant "writing with authority," or interpreting their research. The other three journalists rejected the notion of objectivity as being impossible or prone to abuse. This study's findings indicate that the core values of journalism are incredibly durable, especially among its senior practitioners.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 121 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb82191608eng
dc.identifier.oclc711797404eng
dc.identifier.otherHilesS-120910-T246eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/10553eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2010 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshJournalism -- Objectivityeng
dc.subject.lcshEnvironmental reportingeng
dc.subject.lcshClimatic changes -- Press coverageeng
dc.titleClimate change in the newsroom: journalists' evolving standards of objectivity when covering global warmingeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record