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dc.contributor.advisorStallmann, Judith I.eng
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jessica Elaine, 1979-.eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on April 1, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Judith Stallmann.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Agricultural economics.eng
dc.description.abstractThis study uses panel data to test the impact of Wal-Mart on the rural retail wage. There are observations from 2,986 counties in the contiguous United States from 1990-2005. Previous studies have reported mixed findings of the impact of Wal-Mart on rural wages. Thus the impact of Wal-Mart on rural wages is indeterminate. Wal-Mart could increase rural retail wages if it is a large labor demander relative to labor supply, if it pays higher wages than other rural retailers, if it hires workers for more hours per week than other retailers (because it is open more hours). Wal-Mart could lower rural retail wages if it hires workers for fewer hours than other rural retailers, it hires a different skill mix (fewer managers per worker), it pays higher benefits that compensate for wages, or if it is a monopsonist. The Heckman two-step procedure is the empirical specification used to control for the non-random characteristic of Wal-Mart's location decision. A modified first difference model is used to test the impact of Wal-Mart on rural retail wages. The study finds that Wal-Mart selects counties where the retail wage is growing slowly, and that rural retail wages grow more slowly than urban wages. While the presence of Wal-Mart slows the growth of the overall average weekly retail wage, in rural counties it increases the growth of average weekly retail wage. With the given data set the reason for the increase in the growth of the rural retail wage could not be addressed.eng
dc.format.extentix, 87 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb8219337xeng
dc.identifier.oclc712804262eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/10563
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/10563
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshWal-Mart (Firm)eng
dc.subject.lcshWages -- Retail trade employeeseng
dc.subject.lcshDiscount houses (Retail trade) -- Economic aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshStores, Retail -- Economic aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshSupermarkets -- Economic aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshRetail trade -- Economic aspectseng
dc.titleThe impact of Wal-Mart on the rural retail wageeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural economics (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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