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dc.contributor.advisorLawless, Elaine J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOslica, Amy
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States
dc.coverage.temporal1900-1999
dc.date.issued2011-05
dc.date.submitted2011 Springen_US
dc.description.abstractBy the 1920s, although slavery had been abolished in America decades before, many social, economic and legal inequalities remained between whites and blacks. This is well-known United States history, although to many, it still exists as a rather vague idea, all too easily over-looked, as the injustices are hard to personalize. Many black women writers in American history strived to bridge this gap by providing stories of black women whose life stories were deeply impacted by all of the types of inequalities that existed. Two of the most well known of these authors are Zora Neale Hurston and Jessie Redmon Fauset. These women, with their similarities and differences, put a face to the modern black woman through their story telling. Hurston's novel Their Eyes Were Watching God, as well as her two short stories, “Spunk” and “The Gilded Six-Bits,” provide an interesting comparison to Fauset's novel The Chinaberry Tree and her short story “Emmy.”en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/10704
dc.relation.ispartof2011 Spring theses (MU)
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. College of Arts and Sciences. Department of English
dc.subjectrace relationsen_US
dc.subjectdiscriminationen_US
dc.subjectAmerican literatureen_US
dc.subject.lcshHurston, Zora Neale
dc.subject.lcshFauset, Jessie Redmon
dc.subject.lcshHarlem Renaissance
dc.subject.lcshAfrican American women authors
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Race relations
dc.titleRace, class, gender & property in women's writing of the Harlem Renaissanceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US


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