Explicating journalism-as-a-conversation: two experimental tests of online news

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Explicating journalism-as-a-conversation: two experimental tests of online news

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/10768

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dc.contributor.advisor Thorson, Esther en_US
dc.contributor.author Marchionni, Doreen Marie en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-16T14:13:57Z
dc.date.available 2011-05-16T14:13:57Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2009 Summer en_US
dc.identifier.other MarchionniD-110609-D62 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/10768
dc.description The entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Title from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on January 13, 2011). en_US
dc.description Thesis advisor: Dr. Esther Thorson. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Ph. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism. en_US
dc.description.abstract The concept of journalism as a conversation has been richly explored in descriptive studies for decades. Largely missing from the literature, though, are clear operationalizations that allow theory building for purposes of explanation and prediction. Using Steven Chaffee's articulation of concept-explication as a guide, this dissertation conducted a pair of online news experiments to measure the concept, tracing it in literatures as varied as political communication and computer-network analysis, often as an embedded concept. The first experiment tested whether readers perceive conversational stories as different from traditional stories and as more credible and expert. The second tested types of journalistic conversation on these outcomes. Findings suggest the conversational features coorientation/homophily and interactivity are key, not only in distinguishing this type of news but in predicting its perceived credibility and expertise. en_US
dc.format.extent en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2009 Freely available dissertations (MU) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Online journalism en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Electronic discussion groups en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Communication en_US
dc.title Explicating journalism-as-a-conversation: two experimental tests of online news en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Journalism en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name Ph. D. en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 722923599 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2009 Dissertations


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