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dc.contributor.authorHargis, Saraheng
dc.contributor.authorSt. Paul, Alisoneng
dc.contributor.authorMcClellan, Andreweng
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Researcheng
dc.contributor.meetingnameSummer Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum (2007 : University of Missouri--Columbia)eng
dc.date2007eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.descriptionAbstract only availableeng
dc.description.abstractIn vertebrates, reticulospinal (RS) neurons in the brain activate spinal motor networks to initiate locomotor behavior. Following spinal cord injury (SCI), RS neurons no longer communicate with the spinal cord, and animals are paralyzed below the lesion. In higher vertebrates, such as birds and mammals, the axons of RS neurons do not regenerate, and paralysis usually is permanent. In contrast, spinal cord transected lower vertebrates such as the lamprey display robust axonal regeneration and recovery of function within a few weeks. In our previous studies we showed that following spinal cord hemi-transections (HTs) in larval lamprey, injured RS neurons undergo a number of substantial changes in electrical properties and expression of ion channels which recover within several weeks. The purpose of the present study is to determine the rate of behavioral recovery following HTs and ultimately to correlate axonal regeneration of injured RS neurons with recovery of normal properties of these neurons. In the present study, animals received HTs on the right side of the rostral spinal cord and recovered for 1d - 6 wks. At early recovery times (1 day), animals swam with a spiraling movement and turned toward the intact side of the spinal cord, but the pattern of muscle activity was relatively normal. Swimming movements began to recover within the first week, and by the fourth week animals swam normally with little or no spiraling. In the future, anatomical experiments will be conducted to determine if recovery of swimming following HTs is due to regeneration of injured axons through the HT or to functional compensation of intact pathways on the opposite side of the spinal cord. This information will be important in determining what factors alter the properties of RS neurons following SCI and if these altered properties are important for successful axonal regeneration.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/1087eng
dc.languageen_USeng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Research. Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forumeng
dc.source.urihttp://undergradresearch.missouri.edu/forums-conferences/abstracts/abstract-detail.php?abstractid=eng
dc.subjectreticulospinal neuronseng
dc.subjectspinal cord injuryeng
dc.subjectaxonal regenerationeng
dc.titleRecovery of locomotor function following spinal cord hemi-transections in larval lamprey [abstract]eng
dc.typePresentationeng


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