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dc.contributor.advisorBenoit, William L.eng
dc.contributor.authorHenson, Jayne R., 1979-eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.coverage.temporal2000-2099eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on October 21, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. William L. Benoit.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Communication.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] This investigation utilized the Functional Theory of Campaign Discourse (Benoit, 2007) and previous content analyses of television advertisements to determine whether candidate function (positive and negative statements) and topic (policy/character) emphasis influenced election results and shifts in candidate preference. The first study demonstrated that Presidential and Senate candidate messages influenced general election results over and above that explained by incumbency and competitiveness. Gubernatorial and Senate candidate messages also influenced election results in primary competitions. The second study was a time series analysis of advertisements provided by the Wisconsin Ad study from the 2004 presidential general election and participant reports of vote intention obtained from ANES panel data. Separate time series were constructed for Kerry and Bush's average percentage of acclaims (positive statements) and policy emphasis in all ads run during the general season. Both Kerry's message series influence variation; however, neither of Bush's message strategies affected candidate preference.eng
dc.format.extentxi, 159 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb82635250eng
dc.identifier.oclc733778012eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/10919
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/10919eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri - Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshSpeeches, addresses, etc., American -- History and criticismeng
dc.subject.lcshCommunication in politics -- Historyeng
dc.subject.lcshPolitical campaigns -- Historyeng
dc.subject.lcshMass media -- Political aspects -- Historyeng
dc.subject.lcshPresidential candidates -- Languageeng
dc.subject.lcshRhetoric -- Political aspects -- Historyeng
dc.titleAssessing the predictability of election victory from a functional theory perspectiveeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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