[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHoffman, Timothy Joseph, 1958-eng
dc.contributor.authorManuel, Christopher Aaron, 1977-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 31, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Timothy J. Hoffman.eng
dc.description"May 2010"eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri-Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] In the United States, prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in men. With early detection, definitive therapeutic options can provide a cure. However, undetected extracapsular or regional lymph node metastasis plagues the long-term survival statistics of definitive therapies. In advanced prostate cancer, initial androgen depravation therapy has failed to control cancer progression, and regional lymph node and distant osseous metastasis are common. With metastatic spread, prostate cancer remains incurable. Aberrant expression of the bombesin subtype 2 receptor (BB2r) is present on over 80% of human prostate cancer tissues evaluated. The BB2r binds with high affinity to the bombesin peptide (BBN), stimulating agonist mediated receptor-peptide internalization into the cancer cell. Accordingly, targeting the BB2r with radioisotopes conjugated to BBN represents a promising method for diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceutical development for metastatic prostate cancer. The results of this research demonstrate the potential diagnostic capabilities of BB2r targeted compounds. We also demonstrate a potential mechanism of therapeutic effect while optimizing administration timing, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of BB2r targeted radiotherapy administered with FDA approved, radiosensitizing chemotherapeutics for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. Taken together, BB2r targeted radiopharmaceuticals have the potential to fill a well known clinical need for the diagnosis and treatment of metastatic prostate cancer in human patients.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentxvii, 176 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb82432727eng
dc.identifier.oclc729377971eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/10921eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/10921
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshProstate -- Cancer -- Diagnosiseng
dc.subject.lcshProstate -- Cancer -- Radiotherapyeng
dc.subject.lcshBone metastasis -- Diagnosiseng
dc.subject.lcshLymphatic metastasis -- Radiotherapyeng
dc.subject.lcshBombesin -- Receptors -- Therapeutic useeng
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasms -- diagnosiseng
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Bombesin -- therapeutic useeng
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasms -- radiotherapyeng
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Metastasis -- diagnosiseng
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Metastasis -- radiotherapyeng
dc.titleTargeting the bombesin subtype 2 receptor for the diagnosis and treatment of metastatic prostate cancereng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary pathobiology area program (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record