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dc.contributor.advisorCohen, Samueleng
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Eric Austin, 1984-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on November 3, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Samuel Cohen.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM. A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- English.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] This Master's thesis analyzes one particular character in David Foster Wallace's novel, Infinite Jest (1996): Kate Gompert, a suicidal marijuana addict afflicted with "psychotic depression." I argue that Gompert's character serves as a kind of mouth-piece for Wallace, that is, a kind of platform from which Wallace attempts to better understand and explain the painful and indescribable depression that fermented within his own Self. While the novel consistently posits a neuroscientific, material explanation for such an illness - i.e. the primacy of the body and the tyrannical oppression of brain chemistry - there also exists a spiritual philosophical undercurrent that posits a construction of Self defined by experience and choice. My thesis is organized as follows: first, I provide a brief summary of Infinite jest, before examining the cyclical form of the novel and its manipulation of time and space. Finally, I unpack the crux of my argument - that is, Wallace's understanding of psychotic depression and "the feeling" that drives one to suicide, which remains most thoroughly elucidated in the character of Kate Gompert.eng
dc.format.extentiii, 57 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb82635286eng
dc.identifier.oclc733775647eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/10930
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/10930eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2010 MU restricted theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshWallace, David Foster Criticism and interpretationeng
dc.subject.lcshPsychotic depressioneng
dc.subject.lcshSuicide in literatureeng
dc.subject.lcshSuicide and literatureeng
dc.subject.lcshDrug addiction in literatureeng
dc.title"It is a hell for one": "psychotic depression" and suicide in David Foster Wallace's Infinite jesteng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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