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dc.contributor.advisorBlakely, Mary Kay, 1948-eng
dc.contributor.authorBascuas, Katherine, 1985-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on November 1, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Professor Mary Kay Blakely.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM. A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism.eng
dc.description.abstractNearly half a century after the second wave of the feminist movement, women are still bombarded with stereotypical messages about the female's role in society. One of the most significant of these roles to examine is motherhood. In order to analyze the media's portrayal of mothers, a textual analysis was conducted on department and feature articles from three women's magazines: Good housekeeping, Woman's day, and Family circle. Employing Berger and Luckmann's (1966) theory of the social construction of reality as well as ideological criticism rooted in feminism, this study sought to explore the influence of the feminist movement on the portrayal of mothers both today and during the 1970s. The results indicate that the articles from 1973 were incorporating feminist ideology in the portrayals of mothers, but the trend among these articles was to balance progressive ideology with traditional stereotypes. The influence of feminism was more obvious and pervasive in the articles from 2008. Thirty five years later, mothers are more independent and illustrated with a greater degree of authority in the home. However, there is still room in these magazines for a more accurate reflection of contemporary perceptions of both motherhood and parenting, which would ultimately further the status of women. With awareness, comes the ability to advance a greater social critique and disregard of disparaging stereotypes.eng
dc.format.extentv, 107 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb82637155eng
dc.identifier.oclc733775864eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/10931
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/10931eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshGood housekeeping (New York, N.Y.)eng
dc.subject.lcshWoman's day (New York, N.Y.)eng
dc.subject.lcshFamily circleeng
dc.subject.lcshWomen's periodicalseng
dc.subject.lcshMotherhood in literatureeng
dc.subject.lcshMotherhood in popular cultureeng
dc.titleCan women really have it all?: a textual analysis of the portrayal of mothers in Good housekeeping, Woman's day, and Family circleeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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