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dc.contributor.authorSlatkoff, Susaneng
dc.contributor.authorGamboa, Stepheneng
dc.contributor.authorZolotor, Adam J.eng
dc.contributor.authorMounsey, Anne L.eng
dc.contributor.authorJones, Kohareng
dc.contributor.otherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.date.issued2011-06eng
dc.description.abstractDo not routinely screen all men over the age of 50 for prostate cancer with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Consider screening men younger than 75 with no cardiovascular or cancer risk factors -- the only patient population for whom PSA testing appears to provide even a small benefit. Stength of recommendation: B: Based on a meta-analysis of 6 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with methodological limitations, and a post hoc analysis of a large RCT.eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 50(6) 2011: 357-360.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/10961
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofPriority Updates to Research Literature (PURLs)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectcancer screeningeng
dc.subjectdiagnostic testingeng
dc.subject.lcshProstate -- Cancer -- Diagnosiseng
dc.subject.lcshProstate-specific antigeneng
dc.titlePSA testing: When it's useful, when it's noteng
dc.typeArticleeng


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