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dc.contributor.advisorHubbart, Jason A.eng
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, Graham W.eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissouri -- Hinkson Creek Watershed (Boone County)eng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 27, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Jason A. Hubbart, Ph.D.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Forestry.eng
dc.description.abstractMidwestern streams and rivers of the United States are known for high suspended sediment concentrations (SSC), which is also one of the leading sources of water impairment. Unfortunately, there is a lack of understanding pertaining to land-use and suspended sediment loading relationships. A study was conducted during the spring of 2010 in Hinkson Creek Watershed (HCW) in the City of Columbia, MO, using laser diffraction (LD) technology to estimate SSC and mean particle size. Three hydroclimate/water-quality stations were installed in a nested-scale watershed study design to capture differing land-use type influences on SSC. Mean SSCs were estimated to be 66.0, 70.0, and 86.0 [mu]l/l for the headwater (agricultural), suburban (mixed land-use), and urban sub-basins (respectively). Mean sediment size was estimated to be 151.0, 111.0, and 79.0 [mu]m for the headwater, suburban, and urban sub-basins respectively. Total sediment loads measured at the headwater, suburban, and urban monitoring sites were 13,183, 27,369, and 42,854 tonnes (respectively). Sediment yield was approximately 170.0, 153.0, and 208.0 tonnes/km2 for the headwater, suburban and urban sub-basins respectively. Results indicated that SSC, sediment load, and sediment yield were all highest in the urban sub-basin. This study is the first of its kind in Mid-Missouri to provide quantitative science-based information for improved land-use and water quality in the Midwest.eng
dc.format.extentxviii, 146 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/11170
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2011 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2011Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshWater quality managementeng
dc.subject.lcshSuspended sedimentseng
dc.subject.lcshContaminated sedimentseng
dc.subject.lcshSedimentation and depositioneng
dc.subject.lcshWater -- Pollution -- Measurementeng
dc.titleQuantifying suspended sediment loading in a mid-Missouri urban watershed using laser particle diffractioneng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineForestry (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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