War sirens: how the sheet music industry sold World War I

MOspace/Manakin Repository

Breadcrumbs Navigation

War sirens: how the sheet music industry sold World War I

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/11459

[+] show full item record


Title: War sirens: how the sheet music industry sold World War I
Author: Griffeath, Kristin
Date: 2011-08-26
Publisher: University of Missouri--Kansas City
Abstract: During World War I the U.S. Committee on Public Information (CPI) sponsored a national culture of war in posters, speeches, and films. Against this war-soaked cultural backdrop, the sheet music industry echoed the pervasive messages of the CPI, often using images of women to appeal to the American people. Connections between sheet music and CPI poster themes reflect the cultural dominance of war messages, and themes from various CPI-sponsored materials recur as motifs in the era's sheet music. The sheet music covers, lyrics, and musical cues reinforced prototypical roles for women during the war (from angelic nurses to flirtatious tomboy recruits) as established in the poster art, revealing a gendered cultural code. By purchasing sheet music and carrying it into their homes, American citizens literally bought into the war propaganda, heeding the siren call of the female imagery in CPI advertising to invest materially and emotionally in the war effort. Analysis of cover art, titles, lyrics, and musical examples highlights the use of archetypal images of women from poster and advertising traditions, suggesting that the sheet music industry was an unofficial partner of the CPI.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/11459

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[+] show full item record