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dc.contributor.advisorLoehr, J. Erikeng
dc.contributor.authorBellew, Thomas B.eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on July 21, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Eric Loehr.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Civil engineering.eng
dc.description.abstractSlope failures are not only hazardous to the public, but they are also costly to maintain and repair. A field testing program involving five test sites has been executed in an effort to develop better design practices for slopes reinforced with slender reinforcement. This thesis is directed at three of these sites, including a slope located along Interstate 70 near Emma, MO, a slope located along US 36 near Stewartsville, MO, and a slope located along Interstate 435 (at Wornall Road) in Kansas City, MO. This thesis describes analyses performed to evaluate current analysis models and to develop recommendations for future design of slopes stabilized with slender reinforcement. The analysis models were evaluated by comparing measured bending moments from the field test sites with predicted bending moments calculated using conventional soil-structure interaction models implemented in the commercial software, LPile, Version 5.0®. The models and input parameters for the soil-structure interaction analysis were varied to produce matches between the measured and predicted response of the reinforcement. The models that produced the best results for each site were then collectively assessed to develop recommendations for use in slope designs with slender reinforcement. Results of the analyses described suggest that the "API Sand (O'Neill)" model should be used when modeling reinforcement for long-term, drained loading conditions, regardless of the type of soil present. This model should be used with a p-multiplier selected based on the relative pile batter angle. The soil movement profile should be input as anticipated soil movements down to the sliding depth, and then zero below the sliding depth.eng
dc.format.extentxii, 77 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/11491
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri-Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2011 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2011Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshSoil stabilizationeng
dc.subject.lcshReinforced plasticseng
dc.subject.lcshRecycled productseng
dc.subject.lcshSlopes (Soil mechanics) -- Stabilityeng
dc.titleInvestigation of load transfer models for recycled plastic reinforcement for slope stabilizationeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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