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dc.contributor.advisorFoulkes, Matthew Walton, 1971-eng
dc.contributor.advisorMatisziw, Timothy C. (Timothy Clark)eng
dc.contributor.authorLong, Robert Ivaneng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on July 21, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Matthew Foulkes, Timothy Matisziw.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.description.abstractNewly "discovered" to industrialized societies, alpacas have gained popularity as both livestock and pet in the United States over the last quarter century. This American micro-culture is a nexus of many traditional and post-modern activities; hobby farming, eco-ranching, fiber artistry, show animal competitions, organic textile manufacturing, and participating in a specialized knowledge community. This study explores the relationship between the alpaca lifestyle, breeding enthusiasts, and the fiber industry. Examining a population of Midwest alpaca producers, a qualitative examination of producer motivations as exhibited on alpaca-oriented websites and how these vary across the urban-rural continuum is presented. As a case study of post-modern farming in America, an ongoing reimagination that is guiding this micro-culture and the fiber industry are considered. This thesis is presented by an industry participant and advocate of an alpaca fiber industry. The study is intended to add to the discussion about post-modern agricultural practices in the United States and to literature concerning the animal-human relationship. It concludes that the alpaca industry is trending towards fiber production. Study results indicate that producers of all sorts share common objectives, even if approaching them from differing viewpoints. Lifestyle farmers, breeding enthusiasts and fiber producers will have their roles to play as the alpaca fiber industry develops.eng
dc.format.extentvii, 98 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/11493
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri-Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2011Theseseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshAlpacaeng
dc.subject.lcshAlpaca farmingeng
dc.subject.lcshAlpaca (Textile)eng
dc.subject.lcshPetseng
dc.titleReimagining alpacaseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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