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dc.contributor.advisorMcCarthy, Denis Michael, 1969-eng
dc.contributor.authorNiculete, Maria E.eng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on June 13, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Denis M. McCarthy.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description.abstractAlthough past research has tested the effects of alcohol related priming on behavior and judgments, previous studies have not investigated the effects of alcohol primes on judgments specific to drinking and driving. Based on the spreading activation model, we hypothesized that participants primed with alcohol words will make drinking and driving judgments consistent with their pre-existing attitudes about engaging in the behavior. Participants (N = 302) were randomly assigned to a priming condition (alcohol, safety, danger or neutral words) and they completed a lexical decision task which served as the priming mechanism. Following the primes, participants were asked to make hypothetical drinking and driving judgments. We found a significant interaction (condition X attitudes) on judgments regarding perceived danger of drinking and driving ([beta] = .43, p [less than] .01). Probing this interaction indicated that the standardized simple slope was .15 (p = .32) for participants in the alcohol condition and .70 (p [less than] .001) for participants in the neutral condition. Contrary to our hypothesis, these results suggest that pre-existing attitudes were predictive of drinking and driving judgments following the neutral primes but not following alcohol primes. Results from this study may better fit a dual process model of alcohol cognitions, which suggests that behaviors are influenced by both implicit and explicit cognitions. These effects are stronger for participants who report past drinking and driving behavior suggesting that the alcohol primes may activate implicit cognitions about drinking and driving, which are specifically salient for participants who engage in the behavior.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 29 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/11500
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2011 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2011Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshPriming (Psychology)eng
dc.subject.lcshDrunk driving -- Psychological aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshDrinking of alcoholic beverages -- Psychological aspectseng
dc.titleEffects of alcohol primes on judgments related to drinking and drivingeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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