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dc.contributor.authorRubenstein, Kelly Dayeng
dc.contributor.authorHeisey, Paul W.eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2005eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.description.abstractPrivate funding for agricultural research now exceeds that of the public sector. Other changes have included policies to make greater use of technology transfer mechanisms, such as patents and licensing and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs). A review of the United States Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) suggests these mechanisms did not displace more traditional instruments, such as scientific publications, nor is there any evidence that their use shifted the ARS's research priorities. Although technologies transferred through these mechanisms tended to be of greater interest to private-sector partners than the ARS's research generally, in many cases transferred technologies had public goods attributes.eng
dc.identifier.citationAgBioForum, 8(2&3): 134-142eng
dc.identifier.issn1522-936Xeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/116eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherAgBioForumeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionAgBioForum, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (2005)eng
dc.subjectAgricultural Research Service (ARS)eng
dc.subjectCooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs)eng
dc.subjecttechnology transfereng
dc.subjectUnited States Department of Agriculture (USDA)eng
dc.subjectpatentseng
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Agricultural Research Serviceeng
dc.subject.lcshAgriculture -- Research -- Financeeng
dc.titleCan Technology Transfer Help Public-Sector Researchers Do More with Less? The Case of the USDA's Agricultural Research Serviceeng
dc.typeArticleeng


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