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dc.contributor.advisorGangopadhyay, Shubhraeng
dc.contributor.advisorPolo-Parada, Luiseng
dc.contributor.authorApperson, Steven J., 1982-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on October 25, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisors: Dr. Shubhra Gangopadhyay and Dr. Luis Polo-Parada.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstractThe research described herein is on characterization of nanothermite materials and development of nanothermite microdevices for shock wave generation, microthruster propulsion, and intracellular particle delivery and cell transfection. The research progressed from basic nanothermite combustion characterization to application specific testing of microchip devices. The nanothermite powders were initially characterized in a shock-tube system to demonstrate the production of shock waves. Then a microchip platform was developed to ignite the nanothermite on-chip. The microchips containing nanothermite were then characterized in a shock-tube to compare the shock waves produced in the microchip with those produced by nanothermite powders. The microchips were then modified for safe application to bio-systems. Transfection is demonstrated in primary cells, a cancer cell line, and in whole tissues. The ability to control the level of particle delivery is also demonstrated. Finally, the nanothermites are characterized in a microthruster for comparison of performance with other microthruster fuels. The nanothermites showed generation of high-velocity (up to Mach 3) but low-intensity (shock waves [less than] 1MPa), which are appealing for certain applications. The on-chip igniters were capable of igniting nanothermite with very low energy ( [less than] 100 [microjoule]). The devices for cell transfection showed superior transfection rate and cell survival compared with other transfection methods. The nanothermite also showed superior performance in generating high-amplitude short-duration thrust impulses compared with conventional energetic materials used in microthrusters.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentxii, 91 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872561707eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/11999eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/11999
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisher[University of Missouri--Columbia]eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshNanocomposites (Materials)eng
dc.subject.lcshShock waveseng
dc.subject.lcshThermiteng
dc.subject.lcshTransfectioneng
dc.subject.lcshAluminum oxideeng
dc.subject.lcshFerric oxideeng
dc.subject.lcshAluminothermyeng
dc.titleCharacterization and MEMS applications of nanothermite materialseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and computer engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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