[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorAubrey, Jennifer Stevenseng
dc.contributor.authorHopper, Kathleen Megan, 1979-eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on October 26, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Jennifer Stevens Aubrey.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Communication.eng
dc.description.abstractThe present analysis examined the impact of celebrity gossip magazine coverage on pregnant women through both quantitative and qualitative methods. Study 1 employed both objectification theory (Fredrickson & Roberts, 1997) and social comparison theory (Festinger, 1954) in an experimental design. Results showed that exposure to full-body sexually objectified images and text concerning pregnant celebrities resulted in more social comparison than nonobjectifying images and text. However, exposure to non-objectifying headshot-only images and accompanying text concerning celebrities resulted in significantly more self-objectification than exposure to control images of baby products. Study 2 employed the articulation model of meaning (Hall, 1986) in small group discussions in which participants indicated that they recognize how celebrity gossip magazines sexually objectify pregnant celebrities. Participants largely criticized this sexual objectification while simultaneously describing their own objectification of pregnant celebrities featured in these magazines. Although they did not feel as if they were negatively affected by this sexual objectification in the long term, participants indicated that younger pregnant women most likely are. The results of both studies are interpreted in light of objectification theory, social comparison theory, and the articulation model of meaning.eng
dc.format.extentix, 255 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872561727eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/12006
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/12006eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2010 Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshBody image in womeneng
dc.subject.lcshBody schemaeng
dc.subject.lcshGossip -- Periodicalseng
dc.subject.lcshCelebrities -- Press coverageeng
dc.subject.lcshPregnant women -- Press coverageeng
dc.titleBumping up the body: examining the impact of celebrity gossip magazines on body image during pregnancyeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record