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dc.contributor.advisorKluever, Craig A. (Craig Allan)eng
dc.contributor.authorHorneman, Kenneth R., 1968-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on October 26, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Craig Kluever.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Mechanical and aerospace engineering.eng
dc.description.abstractMuch effort has been put into developing technologies for next generation re-usable launch vehicles. Fully re-usable launch vehicles include a booster stage that is designed to land, usually near the launch site, after it has released the upper-stage, which continues to orbit. The fuel reserve needed to turn the booster stage around will usually be minimal For this reason, once the booster stage has completed a rocket-back maneuver, it will typically be at a high altitude (exo-atmospheric) but with low kinetic energy and a steep flight path angle on re-entry. Traditional re-entry guidance is designed for vehicles with a high velocity, and shallow flight path angle, and thus these traditional approaches are not appropriate for a low energy re-entry (LOER). The current research presents a set of guidance algorithms that will successfully guide a vehicle to landing starting from LOER condition. The guidance algorithms are designed to ensure the vehicle can achieve near optimal range performance when required and also to execute a sharp pull-up maneuver that balances the load factor constraint against the need to pull-up quickly before the dynamic pressure constraint is exceeded. The guidance approach has been tested for a wide variety of vehicles and mission scenarios, including more traditional initial conditions that would occur at the end of a High Energy Re-entry (HIER) from orbit. Thus, the guidance approach we have developed can be used as a more robust version of Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM) guidance, as well as for LOER and has been tested for a wide range of vehicles, including the Space Shuttle and vehicles with a wide variety of L/D capability. Significant development has also gone into the engineering considerations needed to implement the guidance algorithms on a real vehicle. Program execution time, application of vehicle constraints, trajectory repeatability and other factors are all addressed in order to meet this need.eng
dc.format.extentx, 129 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872561765eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/12007
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/12007eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2010 Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshLaunch vehicles (Astronautics) -- Trajectorieseng
dc.subject.lcshLaunch vehicles (Astronautics) -- Guidance systemseng
dc.subject.lcshReusable space vehicleseng
dc.titleAutomated trajectory generation and guidance for a new launch vehicle flight phaseseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical and aerospace engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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