The effect of self-directed learning readiness and online course quality ratings on student satisfaction and academic performance in undergraduate eLearning

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The effect of self-directed learning readiness and online course quality ratings on student satisfaction and academic performance in undergraduate eLearning

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/12262

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Title: The effect of self-directed learning readiness and online course quality ratings on student satisfaction and academic performance in undergraduate eLearning
Author: Mead, Molly Sherk
Date: 2011-12-09
Publisher: University of Missouri-Kansas City
Abstract: Attrition in online programs has historically been much higher than in traditional face to face programs, creating concern regarding the appropriateness of online learning for all populations. This study aimed to address the question of whether students' levels of self-directed learning readiness and the quality ratings of online courses would be related to the ratings of undergraduate student course satisfaction and academic performance in undergraduate eLearning. Students (N=216) at a medium sized, urban, Midwestern University were asked to provide demographic information as well as to complete the Self- Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS-NE) and the Distance Education Learning Environments Survey (DELES). To evaluate online course quality, a purposeful subsample of courses was selected for evaluation using a rubric adopted by the university. The study found that the students' ratings of overall course satisfaction were moderately significantly related (p < .01) to their scores on a measure of self-directed learning readiness. In further examination of the relationship between these two scores, the researcher found that student scores on the SDLRS-NE predicted 8% of the variance in scores on the DELES, (p < .001). When all of the independent variables were added into the model, 21% of the variance in DELES scores was predicted. The researcher also found that actual course grades predicted 4% of the variance in DELES scores. When all the variables were added to the model, 17% of the variance in DELES was explained. Online course quality was determined for a sub-sample of 6 of courses using a rubric adopted by the University. Three of the courses examined passed the minimum requirements and the other 3 did not pass. Correlational analysis found that the course quality ratings were positively related to the student scores on the DELES (p < .001). Analysis of the relationship between the course ratings and students' actual course grades found that quality course ratings explained 9% of the variance in actual grades (p < .01).
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/12262

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