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dc.contributor.authorZilberman, David, 1947-
dc.contributor.authorKim, Eunice
dc.date.issued2011
dc.description.abstractThe modern bio-economy consists of biotechnology, green chemistry, and modern biofuels, and can learn from the experience of the “traditional” bio-economy that relied on processes such as fermentation to alcoholic drinks, foods, and medicine. The traditional bio-economy expanded the range of locations that humans could survive and what they could grow. Lessons of the traditional biotechnology are likely to apply to the modern one. The new bio-economy will require moving outside of our comfort zone and may require us to take calculated risks, but within a technological framework we can control and mitigate these risks. The evolution of the new biotechnology will encounter resistance, but its potential is so vast that it is likely to prevail.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis paper was supported by the EBI.
dc.identifier.citationAgBioForum, 14(3) 2011: 97-103.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1522-936X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/12466
dc.publisherAgBioForumen_US
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionAgBioForum, vol. 14, no. 3 (2011)
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources. Division of Applied Social Sciences. Department of Agricultural Economics. Economics and Management of Agrobiotechnology Center. AgBioForum.
dc.subjectmicrobiological processesen_US
dc.subjectpreservation technologyen_US
dc.subject.lcshAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subject.lcshBiomass energy
dc.subject.lcshEnvironmental chemistry -- Industrial applications
dc.subject.lcshFermentation
dc.titleThe Lessons of Fermentation for the New Bio-Economyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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