[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLin, Jeffeng
dc.contributor.authorKelsberg, Garyeng
dc.contributor.authorSafranek, Saraheng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.description.abstractBoth high-dose oral B12 and injected B12 raised low vitamin B12 levels and improved hematologic parameters and neurologic symptoms in short-term studies (3-4 months) predominantly involving patients with conditions associated with intestinal malabsorption (strength of recommendation: A, randomized controlled trials [RCTs]). Both forms are well tolerated. Oral B12 is less expensive.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/13371
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2012 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Network.eng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 61, no. 03 (March 2012): 162-163.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectsymptom reliefeng
dc.subject.lcshVitamin B12 deficiencyeng
dc.subject.lcshMedical care, Cost ofeng
dc.titleIs high-dose oral B12 a safe and effective alternative to a B12 injection?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


Files in this item

[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record