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dc.contributor.authorHoban, Thomas J.eng
dc.date.issued1998eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.description.abstractThe benefits of agricultural biotechnology have been promised for almost two decades. That promise is becoming reality. A growing number of American farmers are raising crops developed through biotechnology that are protected from insects and require fewer pesticides. As with other commodities, these grains (such as corn and soybeans) are blended into processed foods. That use of biotechnology will be invisible to consumers. In the future, biotechnology will lead to more obvious improvements in the nutritional profiles and other qualities of many foods.eng
dc.identifier.citationAgBioForum 1(1) 1998: 3-7.eng
dc.identifier.issn1522-936Xeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/1386eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherAgBioForumeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionAgBioForum, vol. 1, no. 1 (1998)eng
dc.source.urihttp://www.agbioforum.missouri.edu/v1n1/v1n1a02-hoban.htmeng
dc.subjectinsect resistance ; nutritional profile ; safety concernseng
dc.subject.lcshAgricultural biotechnology -- Public opinioneng
dc.subject.lcshGenetically modified foods -- Public opinioneng
dc.subject.lcshConsumers -- Attitudeseng
dc.titleTrends in Consumer Attitudes about Agricultural Biotechnologyeng
dc.typeArticleeng


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