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dc.contributor.authorHoban, Thomas J.
dc.date.issued1998
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en
dc.description.abstractThe benefits of agricultural biotechnology have been promised for almost two decades. That promise is becoming reality. A growing number of American farmers are raising crops developed through biotechnology that are protected from insects and require fewer pesticides. As with other commodities, these grains (such as corn and soybeans) are blended into processed foods. That use of biotechnology will be invisible to consumers. In the future, biotechnology will lead to more obvious improvements in the nutritional profiles and other qualities of many foods.en
dc.identifier.citationAgBioForum 1(1) 1998: 3-7.en
dc.identifier.issn1522-936X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/1386
dc.publisherAgBioForumen
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionAgBioForum, vol. 1, no. 1 (1998)
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. Division of Applied Social Sciences. Department of Agricultural Economics. Economics and Management of Agrobiotechnology Center. AgBioForum (Journal)
dc.source.urihttp://www.agbioforum.missouri.edu/v1n1/v1n1a02-hoban.htm
dc.subjectinsect resistanceen
dc.subjectnutritional profileen
dc.subjectsafety concernsen
dc.subject.lcshAgricultural biotechnology -- Public opinionen
dc.subject.lcshGenetically modified foods -- Public opinionen
dc.subject.lcshConsumers -- Attitudesen
dc.titleTrends in Consumer Attitudes about Agricultural Biotechnologyen
dc.typeArticleen


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