The role of health risk perception variables on smoking-related outcomes in a motivational interviewing-based intervention for college students

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The role of health risk perception variables on smoking-related outcomes in a motivational interviewing-based intervention for college students

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/13874

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Title: The role of health risk perception variables on smoking-related outcomes in a motivational interviewing-based intervention for college students
Author: Jacobson, John David
Date: 2012-04-16
Publisher: University of Missouri--Kansas City
Abstract: The role of health risk perception in smoking behavior was prospectively evaluated in a cluster-randomized trial for smoking cessation in college students. Optimistic bias, future precaution effectiveness, perceived vulnerability, and smoking behavior measures (quit attempts and cessation) were assessed in 302 college-aged student smokers at baseline, end of treatment (3 months), and follow-up (6 months). Logistic regression analyses that controlled for level of smoking were used to examine risk perception variables as predictor of smoking outcomes. Results revealed that higher baseline future precaution effectiveness predicted a greater likelihood of quit attempts at end of treatment [OR = 1.11 (1.001, 1.24)] and a greater likelihood of cessation [OR = 1.14 (1.01, 1.29)] at follow-up. Unexpectedly, higher baseline levels of perceived vulnerability predicted a reduced likelihood of cessation at end of treatment [OR = .67 (.55, .83)] and follow-up [OR = .78 (.63, .97)]. As expected, however increases in perceived vulnerability from baseline to end of treatment predicted a greater likelihood of quit attempts at end of treatment [OR = 1.57 (1.24, 1.98)] and follow-up (OR = 1.62 (1.25, 2.08)] and cessation at end of treatment [OR = 1.27 (1.01, 1.62)]. Taken as a whole, results suggest that perceived vulnerability was the best predictor of smoking behavior change and supports further examination of the role of risk perceptions in promoting smoking cessation among college smokers.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/13874

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