Alternatively certified and traditionally certified secondary school mathematics teachers' student success on the Missouri Assessment Program

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Alternatively certified and traditionally certified secondary school mathematics teachers' student success on the Missouri Assessment Program

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14170

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Title: Alternatively certified and traditionally certified secondary school mathematics teachers' student success on the Missouri Assessment Program
Author: Wall, Jennifer Joanne
Date: 2012-05-14
Publisher: University of Missouri--Kansas City
Abstract: Since the 1980s, alternative certification programs, with the goals of improving the quality and quantity of teachers, have been preparing teachers through streamlined coursework tailored to the individual teachers' needs. Meanwhile, to improve teacher quality, traditional teacher education programs have been increasing standards required for traditional certification. These competing views on how to improve teacher quality have led to debates on the effectiveness of alternative certification programs and the teachers they certify. This study aimed to gain insight into the effectiveness of alternatively certified secondary mathematics teachers from two alternative certification programs offered at two universities. Alternatively certified secondary mathematics teachers from these programs were recruited to participate, and when possible traditionally certified secondary mathematics teachers in the same schools as participating alternatively certified teachers were also involved in the study. Data were collected on the participating teachers' students' 2008 state achievement mathematics test scores. Using analysis of variance and analysis of covariance tests, the data revealed that, on average, students of the alternatively certified teachers outperformed the students of traditionally certified teachers. Factors that had a significant impact on students' 2008 test scores were students' previous score on the test, students' minority status, and teachers' certification route. While these factors were all significant, students' previous scores accounted for the largest portion of the variance in 2008 scores, and teachers' certification route accounted for the smallest portion. Teachers' number of years of experience was not found to have an impact on students test scores, nor was there a significant interaction between teachers' certification route and students' gender.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14170

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