Religiosity, coping, and psychological well-being among LDS Polynesians in the U.S.

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Religiosity, coping, and psychological well-being among LDS Polynesians in the U.S.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14187

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Title: Religiosity, coping, and psychological well-being among LDS Polynesians in the U.S.
Author: Allen, G. E. Kawika
Keywords: psychological well-being
coping mechanism
spirituality
Polynesian
Date: 2011
Publisher: University of Missouri--Columbia
Abstract: This study examined religiosity, collectivistic coping, and psychological well-being among 94 LDS Polynesians residing in the Midwest. As hypothesized, highly religious LDS Polynesians were more likely to have a healthy psychological well-being and are also likely to use collectivistic coping styles. Family support and religion-spirituality coping styles were also significantly correlated with a positive psychological well-being. However, these collectivistic coping styles did not mediate the relationship between LDS Polynesians' religious commitment and psychological well-being. Implications are discussed in terms of religiosity, culture, coping, and psychological well-being.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14187
Other Identifiers: AllenG-051310-D470

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