The ideal body shape of African American college women

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The ideal body shape of African American college women

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14193

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dc.contributor.advisor Mintz, Laurie B. en_US
dc.contributor.author Bledman, Rashanta A.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-05-17T14:21:04Z
dc.date.available 2012-05-17T14:21:04Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.date.submitted 2011 Summer en_US
dc.identifier.other BledmanR-101110-D190
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14193
dc.description "May 2011" en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Educational and counseling psychology. en_US
dc.description The entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Title from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 17, 2012). en_US
dc.description Thesis advisor: Dr. Laurie Mintz en_US
dc.description Vita. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description.abstract Previous research has examined Black women's body image from a traditional Eurocentric perspective. This has resulted in Black women reporting more positive body image because the research methodology and focus is solely on whether or not these women want to be thin. Rather than focusing on the actual weight on the scales, the overarching goal of this study was to change the focus of body image research with Black women to that of shape and size satisfaction, rather than weight and thinness. Specifically, this study is one of the firsts to examine the ideal body shape of African American women, focusing on level of satisfaction with areas of the body (i.e. the mid and lower torso). Seventy-nine African American women enrolled at the University of Missouri completed an online survey with several instruments designed to measure concerns about body shape and experiences of feeling fat, body image and weight-related concerns, and shape satisfaction. Several regression analyses demonstrated that satisfaction with mid and lower torso significantly influenced body shape satisfaction and overall appearance evaluation. Implications for future research, prevention and counseling are discussed. en_US
dc.format.extent viii, 106 pages en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2011 Freely available dissertations (MU) en_US
dc.subject African American women en_US
dc.subject Black women en_US
dc.subject body image en_US
dc.subject body shape en_US
dc.title The ideal body shape of African American college women en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Educational and counseling psychology en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name Ph. D. en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2011 Dissertations


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