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dc.contributor.advisorPearce, Ibitolaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCorrea, Jennifer G.
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.submitted2011 Summeren_US
dc.description"July 2011"en_US
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 17, 2012).en_US
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Ibitola Pearceen_US
dc.descriptionVita.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Sociology.en_US
dc.description.abstractSince the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, a shift has occurred in the discursive framing of undocumented Mexican immigrants who have entered the United States. The federal State has publicly proclaimed a “War on Terror” solidly coupling immigration and terrorism concerns leading to a rearticulation of “illegal aliens” as would-be “terrorists” via the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). This shift in the discourse has impacted the U.S.-Mexico border by re-framing this geo-socio-political boundary and its inhabitants as a potential terrorism threat to American National Security. The findings demonstrate that the Secure Fence Act of 2006 constructed people of Mexican-origin and the U.S.-Mexico border region as dangerous by for two fundamental purposes: (1) To control and manage a targeted population and; (2) To spread fear among the general population while simultaneously fashioning itself as the knowledgeable expert.en_US
dc.format.extentvii, 241 pagesen_US
dc.identifier.otherCorreaJ-071311-D88
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/14201
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2011 Freely available dissertations (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2011 Dissertations
dc.subjectLatinosen_US
dc.subjectimmigrationen_US
dc.subjectnational borderen_US
dc.subjectpolitical discourseen_US
dc.titleUnheard voices at the Texas-Mexico border wall: fragmentation, citizenship, and opposition in a war on terroren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyeng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US


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