Emotional responsivity in people high and low in trait positive affect

MOspace/Manakin Repository

Breadcrumbs Navigation

Emotional responsivity in people high and low in trait positive affect

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14230

[-] show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Filion, Diane L. (Diane Louise) en
dc.contributor.author Gessner, Stacia N.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-05-18T15:58:45Z
dc.date.available 2012-05-18T15:58:45Z
dc.date.issued 2012-05-18
dc.date.submitted 2012 Spring en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14230
dc.description Title from PDF of title page, viewed on May 18, 2012 en
dc.description Thesis advisor: Diane L. Filion en
dc.description Vita en
dc.description Includes bibliographic references (p. 43-52) en
dc.description Thesis (M.A.)--Dept. of Psychology. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2012 en
dc.description.abstract Previous research has shown that individuals who report high levels of Trait Positive Affect (TPA) experience better mental and physical health outcomes than individuals low in TPA. The current study examined emotional responsivity in forty-five undergraduates who scored either high or low in trait positive affect. Participants' reactions to emotional stimuli were assessed in two phases, a startle testing phase in which affective modulation of startle was assessed while participants viewed emotional pictures, and a picture rating phase in which participants rated the pictures on dimensions of valence and arousal. Affective modulation of startle results revealed that for the high TPA group, emotional responses were significantly stronger to negative pictures compared to neutral or positive pictures. In contrast, those in the low TPA group responded equally to the three picture types. Results for the picture-rating phase revealed that the high TPA group rated negative pictures as more arousing than the low TPA group, but all other ratings were comparable between the groups. Overall, the results of this study indicate that people with high trait positive affect display a heightened emotional reaction to negative stimuli, as seen by self-rated arousal and affective modulation of startle. These results suggest several directions for future research that may further increase understanding of the protective nature of trait positive affect. en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents Introduction -- Review of literature -- Methodology -- Discussion -- Results -- Appendix A. IAPS picture numbers used in startle testing phase -- Appendix B. Tables en
dc.format.extent vii, 53 pages en
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Kansas City en
dc.subject.lcsh Personality assessment en
dc.subject.lcsh Startle reaction en
dc.subject.lcsh Emotions -- Health aspects en
dc.subject.other Thesis -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Psychology en
dc.title Emotional responsivity in people high and low in trait positive affect en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Psychology en
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Kansas City en
thesis.degree.name M.A. en
thesis.degree.level Masters en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] show simple item record