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dc.contributor.advisorPrelas, Mark Antonio, 1953-eng
dc.contributor.authorMontenegro, Daniel Enriqueeng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 21, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Mark A. Prelaseng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.description"July 2011"eng
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, diamond has received a great deal of interest as a potential chemical sensor material due to its mechanical robustness, and its capacity to modify its electrical characteristics according to surface termination and adsorbed chemical agents. Previous studies have suggested that an adsorbed molecule can localize a carrier in the same way a surface trap can. The present work focuses on molecules chemisorbed to the oxygen-terminated surfaces of high-purity CVD single crystal (100) diamond plates. Potentially, a given adsorbed molecule can be uniquely related to a new surface energy state, thus producing a characteristic spectral signature. This technology is named Quantum Fingerprinting[trademark]. To investigate the adsorbate-induced surface energy states, an ultra-sensitive, non-steady state interrogation device called Charge-based Deep-Level Transient Spectrometer (Q-DLTS) was built and tested. This system was used to investigate the effects of various basic alcohols and benzene derivatives on the surface states of the sensor. It was found that both types of molecules produce a large primary spectral peak and a smaller, transient one. For alcohol, both peaks display a consistent increase in amplitude as the molecule's carbon content becomes larger. The secondary peak shows a faster emission rate with heavier alcohol molecules. This was attributed to the appearance of new surface states. The secondary peak of the benzene derivative disappears a few minutes after the initial introduction. This is believed to be the result of physisorption.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentix, 129 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872560870eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/14292
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/14292eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subjectwide-bandgapeng
dc.subjectadsorbateseng
dc.subjectsurface terminationeng
dc.subjectdiamondeng
dc.subjectchemical sensorseng
dc.titleChemical sensor using single crystal diamond plates interrogated with charge-based deep-level transient spectroscopy based on the Quantum Fingerprint[TM] model : instrumentation and methodologyeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineNuclear engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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