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dc.contributor.advisorChrist, Shawneng
dc.contributor.authorMoffitt, Amandaeng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 23, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears on the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Shawn Christeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.description"July 2011"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] Executive function is postulated as one of the core areas of impairment in individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). When measured in isolation, however, aspects of executive function such as working memory and inhibitory control have often been found to be intact in ASD cohorts. It remains unclear to what extent impairments may be more readily observed when demands are placed concurrently on multiple aspects of executive function. To evaluate whether ASD-related impairments in inhibitory control are exaggerated in the presence of additional executive demands, we employed a paradigm that allowed for the independent manipulation of both working memory and inhibitory demands. An antisaccade eye movement task was used to assess inhibitory performance in 15 individuals with ASD and 49 typically developing individuals. Each participant completed the task in the presence of low and high secondary working memory demands. Individuals with ASD demonstrated impaired inhibitory control as compared to the non-ASD group, and this impairment was found to be static across development when performing the task under a low memory load. However, an increase in concurrent working memory load had a different impact on inhibitory performance between the two groups. Specifically, older children with ASD showed a larger deficit in inhibitory control than younger children suggesting that this deficit emerges with age in individuals with ASD.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 49 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/14355
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2011 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjectworking memoryeng
dc.subjectcognitioneng
dc.subjectautismeng
dc.subjectexecutive functioneng
dc.titleThe impact of secondary working memory demands on inhibitory performance in individuals with and without autism spectrum disordereng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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