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dc.contributor.advisorBorduin, Charles M.eng
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Erin K.eng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 24, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears on the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Charles M. Borduineng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description"July 2011"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Developers of family-based interventions have suggested that female juvenile offenders are more difficult to treat than their male counterparts due to socially hostile behaviors exhibited toward families, peers, and providers. Inasmuch as the family represents a key socialization unit during adolescence, it is possible that the interpersonal hostility exhibited by female juvenile offenders is developed or maintained through transactions with their family members. To examine this issue, the present study measured relational aggression in the family transactions of 140 adolescents who were divided into four demographically matched groups (female juvenile offenders, male juvenile offenders, female nonoffenders, and male nonoffenders). Adolescents and their parents were videorecorded as they completed a discussion task pertaining to family affect, decision making, and discipline. Raters coded relationally aggressive behaviors at the dyadic (i.e., between two family members) and individual (i.e., from one person to all other family members) levels. Results showed that female juvenile offenders and their mothers directed greater amounts of relational aggression toward each another than did mother-adolescent dyads in the other groups. In addition, regardless of offender status, female adolescents directed more relational aggression toward other family members than did male adolescents. Implications of these results for treatment and research are discussed.eng
dc.format.extentv, 24 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/14364
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2011 UM restricted theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2011 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjectjuvenile offendereng
dc.subjectrelational aggressioneng
dc.subjectsocialization uniteng
dc.subjectparent-child relationshipeng
dc.titleRelational aggression in families of female juvenile offenderseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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