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dc.contributor.advisorvom Saal, Frederick S.eng
dc.contributor.authorPonzi, Davideeng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 30, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Frederick S. vom Saaleng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biological sciences.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri-Columbia 2011.eng
dc.description"December 2011"eng
dc.description.abstractOn the basis of life history theory, the delayed reproductive maturity represented by an extended period of childhood and juvenility in humans is predicted to be important for learning cultural, social, and ecological skills that help prepare the child for the adult socio-competitive environment. During this developmental period, boys and girls show behavioral sex differences in play and social interactions. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, with its products cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), seems to play a pivotal role mediating the relationships between the social environment and an individual's life history strategies. Yet the processes that underlie the biological embedding of social information remain unclear in humans. Using a multidisciplinary approach spanning from cultural and cognitive anthropology to human ethology, this work illustrates that children with low maternal bond show higher cortisol reactivity to a mild social stressor and that cortisol reactivity is inversely correlated to non verbal behaviors representing levels of relaxation. It was also demonstrated that in the population under study children social network is sex segregated and that boys tend to have higher clustered friendship ties than girls. Finally, it was investigated the relationship between hormones reactivity in response to a competitive challenge and its relation with coaltionary and kinship relationships.eng
dc.format.extentxii, 179 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872560760eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/14443
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/14443eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subjectchild developmenteng
dc.subjectcortisoleng
dc.subjectsex differenceseng
dc.subjectsocial network analysiseng
dc.subjectstressoreng
dc.titleSocial and psychobiological regulation of the human child's hypothalamus-pituitary-axis: an ontogenetic perspectiveeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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