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dc.contributor.advisorBeerntsen, Brenda T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Renee Nicole
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.submitted2011 Fallen_US
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 30, 2012).en_US
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Brenda Beerntsenen_US
dc.descriptionVita.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Molecular microbiology & immunology.en_US
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri-Columbia 2011.en_US
dc.description"December 2011"en_US
dc.description.abstractMalaria is responsible for approximately 250 million human infections and about a million deaths annually and is caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, with P. falciparum the most pathogenic form of human malaria. In an effort to discover molecules that aid in parasite invasion, P. falciparum MAL13P1.319 (PfMAL13P1.319) was identified by a search of the Plasmodium genome database and demonstrates significant similarity with orthologs in other Plasmodium spp. and no orthologs in humans. The PfMAL13P1.319 transcript was present during the erythrocytic stages, oocyst sporozoites, and salivary gland sporozoites and protein was detected only during the late erythrocytic stages. Additional mosquito parasite stages not previously observed or reported, such as zygotes, hemolymph sporozoites, and oocyst sporozoites, also were analyzed however displayed no detection of PfMAL13P1.319. The functional role of PfMAL13P1.319 has yet to be determined, although multiple failed attempts at disrupting the gene would suggest that the PfMAL131.319 protein may have an important function for intraerythrocytic parasites. A comparative study of the P. berghei ortholog of MAL13P1.319 (PbMAL13P1.319) discovered a 2.0-kb gene predicted to encode a surface or secreted antigen and has transcript expression during the erythrocytic stages. Overall, this dissertation describes the characteristics of MAL13P1.319 in parasite biology.en_US
dc.format.extentxi, 153 pagesen_US
dc.identifier.merlinb87209974
dc.identifier.oclc805564185
dc.identifier.otherRobertsR-120911-D348
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/14447
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2011 Freely available dissertations (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2011 Dissertations
dc.subjectparasitic organismen_US
dc.subjectdisease transmissionen_US
dc.subjecterythrocytic stagesen_US
dc.subjectparasite biologyen_US
dc.subject.lcshPlasmodium falciparum -- Genetics
dc.subject.lcshPlasmodium falciparum -- Microbiology
dc.subject.lcshMalaria -- Genetic aspects
dc.subject.lcshProteins
dc.subject.meshPlasmodium falciparum -- genetics
dc.subject.meshPlasmodium falciparum -- microbiology
dc.subject.meshMalaria -- genetics
dc.subject.meshProtozoan Proteins -- genetics
dc.titleInsights into understanding malaria parasite biology: characterization of the Plasmodium protein, MAL13P1.319en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular microbiology & immunologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular microbiology & immunologyeng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US


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