Development and validation of two influenza assessments: exploring the impact of knowledge and social environment on health behaviors

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Development and validation of two influenza assessments: exploring the impact of knowledge and social environment on health behaviors

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14449

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dc.contributor.advisor Barrow, Lloyd H. en_US
dc.contributor.author Romine, William
dc.date.accessioned 2012-05-30T17:48:49Z
dc.date.available 2012-05-30T17:48:49Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.date.submitted 2011 Fall en_US
dc.identifier.other RomineW-113011-D127
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14449
dc.description Title from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 30, 2012). en_US
dc.description The entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Dissertation advisor: Dr. Lloyd H. Barrow en_US
dc.description Vita. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Curriculum and instruction. en_US
dc.description Ph. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011. en_US
dc.description "December 2011" en_US
dc.description.abstract Assessments of knowledge and perceptions about influenza were developed for high school students, and used to determine how knowledge, perceptions, and demographic variables relate to students taking precautions and their odds of getting sick. Assessments were piloted and validated using the Rasch model (n = 205). The 2-parameter logistic model and the k-means clustering algorithm were used for scoring of final participants (n = 410). Kendall-tau correlations were evaluated at the α= 0.05 level, multinomial logistic regression was used to identify the best predictors and to test for interactions, and neural networks were used to test how well precautions and illness can be predicted using the significant correlates. Knowledge was positively correlated to compliance with vaccination, hand washing frequency, and respiratory etiquette, and negatively correlated with hand sanitizer use. Perceived risk was positively correlated to compliance with flu vaccination; perceived complications to personal distancing and staying home when sick. Perceived risk and complications increased with reported illness severity. Perceived barriers decreased compliance with vaccination, hand washing, and respiratory etiquette. Factors such as gender, ethnicity, and school, had effects on more than one precaution. Hand washing quality and frequency could be predicted moderately well. Implications for future uses of the instruments and development of interventions regarding influenza in high schools are discussed. en_US
dc.format.extent xii, 190 pages en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2011 Freely available dissertations (MU) en_US
dc.subject influenza en_US
dc.subject secondary education en_US
dc.subject disease transmission en_US
dc.subject risk assessment en_US
dc.title Development and validation of two influenza assessments: exploring the impact of knowledge and social environment on health behaviors en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Learning, teaching and curriculum en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name Ph. D. en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2011 Dissertations


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