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dc.contributor.advisorBarrow, Lloyd H.eng
dc.contributor.authorRomine, Williameng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 30, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Lloyd H. Barroweng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Curriculum and instruction.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.description"December 2011"eng
dc.description.abstractAssessments of knowledge and perceptions about influenza were developed for high school students, and used to determine how knowledge, perceptions, and demographic variables relate to students taking precautions and their odds of getting sick. Assessments were piloted and validated using the Rasch model (n = 205). The 2-parameter logistic model and the k-means clustering algorithm were used for scoring of final participants (n = 410). Kendall-tau correlations were evaluated at the α= 0.05 level, multinomial logistic regression was used to identify the best predictors and to test for interactions, and neural networks were used to test how well precautions and illness can be predicted using the significant correlates. Knowledge was positively correlated to compliance with vaccination, hand washing frequency, and respiratory etiquette, and negatively correlated with hand sanitizer use. Perceived risk was positively correlated to compliance with flu vaccination; perceived complications to personal distancing and staying home when sick. Perceived risk and complications increased with reported illness severity. Perceived barriers decreased compliance with vaccination, hand washing, and respiratory etiquette. Factors such as gender, ethnicity, and school, had effects on more than one precaution. Hand washing quality and frequency could be predicted moderately well. Implications for future uses of the instruments and development of interventions regarding influenza in high schools are discussed.eng
dc.format.extentxii, 190 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872561465eng
dc.identifier.otherRomineW-113011-D127eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/14449eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2011 Freely available dissertations (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2011 Dissertationseng
dc.subjectinfluenzaeng
dc.subjectsecondary educationeng
dc.subjectdisease transmissioneng
dc.subjectrisk assessmenteng
dc.titleDevelopment and validation of two influenza assessments: exploring the impact of knowledge and social environment on health behaviorseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineLearning, teaching and curriculum (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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