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dc.contributor.advisorYao, Gang, Ph. D.eng
dc.contributor.authorShuaib, Alieng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 30, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Gang Yaoeng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biological engineering.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.description"December 2011"eng
dc.description.abstractOptical methods are promising for non-invasive tissue characterization. Biological tissues can be classified into isotropic tissues and anisotropic tissues. The optical properties of isotropic tissues such as adipose tissue are independent of measurement direction. However, optical properties of anisotropic tissues such as tendon are different along different measurement directions. We used Monte Carlo simulation to study light propagation in fibrous tissues such as tendon and cartilage. Fibrous tissues were modeled as a mixture of aligned cylinders and randomly distributed background spherical particles. Both spatial- and time-resolved reflectance measurements were simulated and compared with predictions from anisotropic diffuse theory. Optical scattering and absorption properties of fibrous tissue can be measured by numerically fitting the analytical diffuse solution to time-resolved reflectance. The results indicated that both isotropic and anisotropic diffuse theory can be applied to derive the background optical properties of fibrous tissue. The scattering properties of the fibrous component can also be also determined if the fiber size is known. Experimental studies were also conducted to study time-resolved reflectance in fibrous tissue by using a fiber optics based low-coherence Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The experimental system was validated in tissue phantoms. In tendon samples, the measured time-resolved reflectance was different at different measurement angles, which was satisfactorily explained by using the anisotropic diffuse theory. Both optical absorption and scattering properties can be derived by fitting the time-resolved isotropic diffusion solution to experimental measurements.eng
dc.format.extentxii, 119 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872561221eng
dc.identifier.otherShuaibA-120911-D114eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/14451eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subjectphoton migrationeng
dc.subjectMonte Carlo simulationeng
dc.subjectturbid mediumeng
dc.subjectanisotropic diffuse equationeng
dc.titleCharacterizing optical properties in fibrous tissueseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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