Course delivery methods and instructional approach for academic success in high school distance education courses

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Course delivery methods and instructional approach for academic success in high school distance education courses

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14454

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Title: Course delivery methods and instructional approach for academic success in high school distance education courses
Author: Smalley, Kristi D.
Keywords: distance learning
virtual learning
secondary education
online courses
Date: 2011
Publisher: University of Missouri--Columbia
Abstract: This study uses a quasi-experimental design to examine online courses delivered to high school aged students from a distance education program located at the University of Missouri. Asynchronous online courses were compared to semester-based courses. Semester-based courses had a calendar with a start and ending date, due dates for assignments, and scheduled chats for interaction between other students and the instructor. Asynchronous courses did not have such features. These two types of courses were compared in terms of student experiences, satisfaction, and academic achievement. The researcher constructed an online survey to gather student perceptions on their experiences, while academic achievement data was gathered from the school's school information system (SIS). Based on the survey data collected from 50 students, no significant difference was found in terms of student experiences and satisfaction between students enrolled in the two types of courses. However, in the analysis of SIS data of 1,207 students, there were statistically significant differences when comparing the academic achievement as measured by final course grades and course completion rates. Students in semester-based courses had higher course grades overall. Likewise, students in semester-based courses had a higher completion rate of 86.2% of students completing their online coursework, while only 62.4% of their asynchronous counterparts completed their online courses.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14454
Other Identifiers: SmalleyK-120111-D22

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