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dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Thomas G.eng
dc.contributor.authorGautam, Shriniwaseng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 31, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Thomas G. Johnsoneng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh.D. University of Missouri-Columbia, 2011eng
dc.description"December 2011"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] This dissertation is composed of three papers relating to healthcare access and efficiency. Focus of the first paper is to develop a gravity-based index of healthcare access for Missourians (both at county and sub-county levels). Analysis of the access measures at the county and sub-county levels depict why use of county level access as the basis for policy formulation may not be effective in addressing the disparity in access at sub-county levels. The calculated index is found to be significantly and positively correlated with the rurality of Missouri counties. The second paper deals with the estimation of relative efficiency of Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs) in Missouri using Data Envelopment Analysis and also tests for the efficiency difference between CAHs with other Acute Care Hospitals. Efficiency estimates for CAHs vary considerably, and a majority of the CAHs are inefficient relative to benchmark CAHs. Compared to other rural hospitals and teaching hospitals, CAHs are statistically poor performers. The third paper consists of two steps. First, a state-level healthcare system performance index is estimated for the US states employing stochastic frontier model. A distinct regional pattern is seen with clustering of high-high and low-low performing states. In the second stage, spatial dependence in healthcare system performance among states is tested. Results indicate a significant spatial dependence when the spatial lag model is specified with appropriate weight matrix.eng
dc.format.extentxii, 148 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872562607eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/14470eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/14470
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjectaccess to healthcareeng
dc.subjectrural areaseng
dc.subjectcritical access hospitaleng
dc.subjectperformance indexeng
dc.titleThree essays on healthcare access and efficiencyeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural economics (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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