[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKirk, Mark D.eng
dc.contributor.authorSpears, Kathleeneng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 31, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Mark D. Kirkeng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biological sciences.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri-Columbia 2011.eng
dc.description"December 2011"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Intracranial stem cell transplantation has may restore central nervous system (CNS) function and compensate for neural cell loss. However, immunological rejection of stem cells can limit the effectiveness of such therapy. Neuralized embryonic stem cells (nESCs) were grafted into the striatum of murine hosts and monitored from 3 days to 6 weeks post-transplantation. Allogeneic nESCs were rapidly rejected brain grafts over the course of 7 days, while syngeneic grafts persisted for greater than 14 days. Our results indicate that rejection of nESCs occurs within the CNS, and demonstrates that intraparenchymal antigens can recruit a systemic immune response; the adaptive immune system is strongly implicated in the destruction of graft tissue. We also describe a novel NSC culture system with the potential for intracranial transplantation, derived from ES cells, that maintains and expands a population of neural stem cells similar to those in the developing and adult brain. FLOW cytometry, qRT-PCR, and immunocytochemistry were used to examine the unique structures formed by embryonic stem cells that exhibit key properties of a developing neural stem cell niche. We believe this system to have promising applications in stem cell transplantation, emphasizing the importance of understanding graft rejection in the brain in order to effectively introduce and preserve this complex microenvironment in intracranial transplantation therapy.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 183 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872563556eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/14474
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/14474eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subjectbrain transplantationeng
dc.subjectstem cell nicheeng
dc.subjectt-celleng
dc.subjectimmunologyeng
dc.titleImmunogenic properties of neuralized embryonic stem cells in a model of allogenic intracranial transplantationeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record